Foxwell Tech Support

 

1.How To Update Original FOXWELL Automotive Scanners

Here’s  how to update original FOXWELL automotive scanners, including NT6XX, NT5XX and NT4XX series.

1. Visit the official site www.foxwelltech.com and then click Register (you can find it both at the top right of the website or at the lower side of home page) to create a Foxwell ID. Create a unique user name and password, and enter a valid email address to complete the registration. If you have already had a Foxwell ID, just click the Sign in link at the top right of the website to login.

2. Boot up your scan tool and locate the serial number and registration password, which are used to register your product.

3. Associate your serial number and registration password with your Foxwell ID by selecting New Registration.

4. Visit our site and click Product. Find your product model and click it to view the product profile. Select Download tab. Download the PC update application and install it.

5. Launch the update tool Foxscanner by double clicking the desk icon and login with your Foxwell ID and password.

6. Remove the SD card from your tool, and then plug it into your computer.

7. Select My Update then all the updates applicable to your tool display. Click Update button to start updating. Depending on the file size of the update packaging, the update time varies from one model to another. We strongly advise you to update no more than 5 items each time. Please make sure you have selected the right Part number. If your scanner is NT630 and you are in Australia, please select NT630AU other than NT630. If the registration still fails with the right part number, please send the product serial number and password, which can be found by booting up the scanner, selecting Setup and then About, tosupport@foxwelltech.com with a brief explanation of the problem you may have, and we will check it and get back to you with a solution in one business day.

 

 

2.How TO Test Your Automotive Battery

It’s important to test your battery and electrical system regularly, not just when it’s starting to show signs of weakness.  Proactively testing it (or making sure your mechanic does) at least once a year will help reduce your chances of failure.  Refer to your owner’s manual and your battery tester manual for instructions. Review all safety instructions that came with your tester and battery.car-battery car-battery-2

Note: Conventional wet cell car batteries are filled with a mixture of water and sulfuric acid. Wear gloves and handle the battery with care so no liquid spills on your skin or clothing. Battery acid can cause severe burns. If a spill does occur, wash with plenty of water and neutralize the acid by applying baking soda.

 

Fully charged automotive batteries should measure at 12.6 volts or above. When the engine is running, this measurement should be 13.7 to 14.7 volts. If you don’t have a multimeter to tell you the voltage of your battery, you can do a test of your electrical system by starting the car and turning on the headlights. If they are dim, that indicates the lights are running off the battery and that little or no charge is being produced by the alternator. If the lights get brighter as you rev the engine, it means the alternator is producing some current, but may not be producing enough at idle to keep the battery properly charged. If the lights have normal brightness and don’t change intensity as the engine is revved, your charging system is probably functioning normally. If you’ve been experiencing problems with your battery system and the headlight test checks out okay, you should check whether or not the battery is holding a charge, or if something on the vehicle is discharging it.

There are three likely scenarios that could explain the problems you’re having:

    1. A high parasitic draw (“key-off” load). This can quickly discharge a battery and decrease its service life. This may be caused by a trunk light, cigarette lighter, clock/radio, alarm system or any other electrical device. Current drain on the battery can be checked with an ammeter. With the ignition off, disconnect one of the battery cables. Connect one ammeter lead to the battery and the other to the cable. The normal current drain on most vehicles should be about 25 milliamps or less. If the key-off drain exceeds 100 milliamps, there’s an electrical problem that requires further diagnosis. If you don’t want to take your car to a mechanic, the easiest way to isolate the problem is to pull one fuse at a time from the fuse panel until the ammeter reading drops.
    2. A problem with your battery is causing it to not hold a charge. To check this, wait 12 to 24 hours after charging to the full voltage, keep the battery out of the vehicle and measure its voltage. Another faster but less preferable way to do this is to turn on the high-beam headlights for 15 seconds, turn them off, wait five to 10 minutes, then check the voltage. If you measure the voltage of the battery the next day, week or even a month later, the voltage should be close to the max voltages listed above. If the voltage holds when not installed in your vehicle, but drops when it is in your vehicle, see 1 above.
    3. The battery was somehow discharged, and your maintenance charger can’t properly charge your deeply discharged battery. Please see the directions for charging a deeply discharged battery.

Add:you should know about  battery ratings before you  test or replace  car battery:

Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) This is the most common battery capacity rating. The rating is the number of amps the battery can deliver for 30 seconds at 0 degrees F. while maintaining post voltage of 7.2 Volts. For reliable cold weather starting, most vehicles require 400 to 600 cold cranking amps. Larger displacement engines require more cranking amps. Some batteries are rated up to 1000 CCA, but may sacrifice reserve capacity to achieve high short term outputs.

here’s article about Test AGM Sealed Battery and Get Rated CCA with Foxwell BT100

Cranking Amps (CA) This is a less meaningful rating. It is the same as CCA except it is measured at 32 degrees F. A battery’s CA rating can be converted to CCA by dividing the number by 1.28 (Example: a CA rating of 500 amps becomes 390 CCA).

Reserve Capacity (RC) Think of this as the battery’s staying power. This is the number of minutes the battery will deliver 25 amps and still maintain a post voltage of 10.5 Volts. The higher the reserve capacity rating, the longer the battery will last if the charging system fails.

 Amp Hour Rating (A/H) This rating is not used much any more. It measures low current draw for 20 hours while maintaining a minimum post voltage of 10.5 Volts at 70 degrees F. (Example: a drain of 3 amps for 20 hours = 60 A/H rating).

Battery Installation

When installing a new battery, clean the posts and inspect the battery cables. Also, check the negative battery cable ground connection and the integrity of any engine ground straps. Loose or corroded connections can cause starting and charging problems.

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