DIY decode active TPMS Using Foxwell NT1001 Trigger Tool

I am new to TPMS decode and activation, so when I find Foxwell NT1001 TPMS Trigger Tool, I confirm it is very suitable for me, its operation can’t be more easy by following the packed user manual and the screen prompt.

I use NT1001 to decode and active TPMS on many car brands models, hope my yes and no list can help.

1) Resetting the TPMS sensors on our 2013 Cruze. Told me all the info I would want about the wheel sensors, too. The remote control detector was a little iffy.

2) 2014 gm vehicles Yes

3) Cadilac CTS 2013 TPM Sensor Yes

4) Works on both 4 and 5 wheel sensors Yes

5) Re-program tpms sensor on 2013 Honda – No

6) 2008 Nissan Maxima do this tpms program and program the ecu for a new tire sensor –No (I was advised to use GT80 mini, considering it is big and covers other functions that I didn’t want, I did’t take the advice but use other little tool)

More will continue…

The seller sent me a PDF which incl. all the tested vehicle list, you could refer to it: http://www.foxwelltool.com/upload/pro/201607/tpms-trigger-tool-nt1001-vehicle-list.pdf

I was not always ok with Foxwell NT1001, I had no luck to read the TPM sensor information on 2007 Subaru Outback and 2010 Dodge Ram 1500, emailed to http://www.foxwelltool.com, and told the using tip saying “ firstly please make sure the distance between the vehicle and machine not exceed 5cm, then use the built-in magnet to move around the sensor to adjust the frequency, when the device can read your sensor, it means you have adjusted frequency successfully.” Hope this can help you 🙂

I like Foxwell NT1001 for another reason is it can access to the website to update for newest models and bug fix. Here another tip: please turn off the machine firstly, hold down the “Help” key, and then connect to the computer.

Done.

Hope it helps.

Buy Foxwell GT80 PLUS get free Foxwell NT1001

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